©2019 by Canvas Literary Journal

Published by Cosmographia Books

Background art “Camouflage” by Hyung Jin Lee

Canvas logo by Ali Wrona

Our Autumn 2019 issue (our largest ever) contains the work of 53 teen writers and artists

from the U.S., Canada, China, Georgia, India, Japan, South Africa, and South Korea.

While you're here:

-Enter the Haunted House of Canvas! 

-Visit the Museum of Canvas

- Get to know our teen editors

Or just read our new issue online. Table of contents below.

Art

Writing

Cover art: “Camouflage” by Hyung Jin Lee (MoC)

Frontispiece: “Volunteer” by Sydney Lee

Interior art: “light me the way home” by Anne Gvozdjak

Interior art: ​“Blind Ambition” by Julia Do (MoC)

Interior art: “All Hallow’s and Cats” by Giana LaSpina  

Interior art: “Lonely Girl” by Sloka Ganne

Interior art: “Overflow” by Anna Frankl (MoC)

“fox-jaw” by Olivia Bell

“What does on do when they meet a god?” by Aliza Li

“loving” by Sophia Hlavaty

“nocturne in the fist of the aquarium” by Ana Chen

“After the Failed Audition” by Jodie Meng

“Thoughts & Prayers” by Ali Fishman

“Illusion” by Alexis Yang

“Aging” by Maddie Botti

“Magic Hands” by Nicole Li

“static” by mathilda barr

“Romeo craves fifteen minutes of fame” by Cathleen Weng

“Loss Tastes Like McDonald’s” by Patrick Wang

“juicebox love affair” by Sarah Uhlman

“When the Rose Bloomed” by Anna Carson

“The Shoplifter” by Dedeepya Guthikonda

“They Let Me Pass” by Maia Siegel

“here is the church and here is the steeple” by Sarah Uhlman

“White Lady Etude” by Kevin Kong

“Rabbit Luck” by Nicole Li

“balloons don’t belong in heaven” by Julia Do

“The Day My Mother Sold My Piano” by Cynthia Wang

“Butterflies” by Pia Bhatia

“I Wish” by Tiffany Liu

“Her” by Patrick Wang

“Brown-Skinned Girls” by Anushka E.

“Looking for Joy” by Alaina DiSalvo

“Hands” by Laya Reddy

“all-nighter” by Margaux Emmanuel

“Elegy (Gladiolus)” by Sabrina Guo

“strawberry moon, strawberry baby” by natalie owen

“How to Look for Magic in the Stars” by Drishika Nadella

 

Halloween

“How to  Carve a Jack-o-Lantern” by Jyotsna Nair

“HALLOWEEN . . . THE HAUNTED SCREAMS!” by Oreo_M

“a quiet house” by Anna Wenzel

“The Hoarder” by Lita Gi

“Emmylou, or The Decision” by R. M. Lawler

“Erasure” by Maya Epstein

“Not So Dark Anymore?!” by Rusudan Janjalashvili

“The Clock” by Priyanka Shrestha

“little fires everywhere” by Nicole Li

“Ghosting” by Artemisio Romero y Carver

“My Emotional History with Zombie Movies” by Jimmy Francis  

“The Autumn Rag” by Lucia Margarita Follman

“The Prophetess” by Grace Peng

“The Deceit of Mythology” by Jennifer Martocci

“The Thing About Perfection” by Michelle Ma

“The Insomniac” by Maddie Botti

“The Candlewick Man” by Noah Oh

"A Stain in the River" by Sofia Pham

“i know the caged bird” by Nia Sampson

“Empty” by Claire McNerney

“A Halloween Wish” by Cora LeCates

ENTER THE HAUNTED HOUSE OF CANVAS!

screencapture-editor-wix-html-editor-web

The print issue of

Canvas Autumn 2019

is now available!

Find it on amazon

for $12.95

Canvas - Autumn 2019 - Front Cover .jpg
 
 
 

We would like to sincerely thank all the teen board members who gave their blood, sweat, and tears to Canvas since our first issue in Spring 2013. You are all fine editors and fine people.

 

Ana Anaya

Abby Johnson

Sophie Moon

Sarah Moore

Marcelo Ortiz

Delaney Palma

Julia Taylor

Sophia Trzcinski

Bella Watts

Amelia Willard

Tori Wilson

Peter Wood

Ali Wrona

Cheyenne Zaremba

Vanessa Zimmerman

Lisa Zou 

 

 

And the adult advisors and Writers & Books staff who helped Canvas grow and flourish:

 

Sally Bittner Bonn

Lindsey Buck

Chris Fanning

Joe Flaherty

Daniel Herd

Kristen King

 

Canvas Teen Literary Journal publishes the work of teen writers and artists 13-18 years old, read and rated by a board of teen editors. Our contributors and editors are from all over the English-speaking world and represent some of the best teen writing out there, in our humble opinion.

 

Canvas was established by Writers & Books in Rochester, New York in 2013, ran continuously for 4 years, took a 1.5 year hiatus, and was restructured and re-established by Cosmographia Books in 2018. Nina Alvarez and Lindsay Herko both oversee the publication of the journal.

Each issue is available to read for free at CanvasLiteraryJournal.com. Issues are available through amazon and at a growing number of libraries. 

Canvas:

(noun) a tent made of canvas fabric

(noun) a large piece of fabric by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel

(verb) consider in detail and subject to an analysis in order to discover essential features or meaning

(noun) the setting for a narrative or fictional or dramatic account

 

OUR NAME

 

Naming our magazine was the very first challenge we faced as a literary board. We wanted our title to mean something to us rather than just be a pretty sounding word or a clever pun.

We debated word after word for hours. With each one, we asked: When stripped down to nothing but a definition, how much weight did this word really carry?

Finally, after two meetings of not finding anything that felt right, someone threw out the word “canvas” into the room.

 

“Tent:” The first definition of canvas is “a tent made of canvas fabric.” A tent is a place of solace, something that protects us from the elements. We hope that Canvas helps you find solace and connection.

“Fabric that propels:” The second definition of canvas is “a large piece of fabric by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel.” We want this journal to propel teens into writing, sharing, and inspiring one another.

“To consider in detail:” The third definition is "to consider in detail and subject to analysis in order to discover essential features of meaning." Our contributors work is born of deeply considered detail, and we apply the same consideration to our selection process.

“Setting:” The fourth definition, “setting for a narrative of fictional or dramatic account,” references the backdrop to a piece of fiction. In turn, our stories and poems help us define the world we live in, the canvas of our lives. Need we say more? 

-written by 2013 board member Abby Johnson