MUSEUM

OF

canvas10-swirls.png

EST. 2018

In Conversation with Jean Park

CV_P3273638.jpg

"Fleeting 20s" by Jean Park. Watercolor and pastel. Back cover art for the Canvas Spring 2019 issue.

Below is discussion between Canvas Editor-in-Chief Lindsay Herko and Spring 2019 back cover artist Jean Park

LINDSAY

 

The title of your piece “Fleeting 20s” is very intriguing—as a writer viewing your piece, I would say it's alluring to me on a poetic level too. Can you tell us what it means to you, and how that relates to the piece?  

 

 

 

JEAN

 

I wanted to depict the fleeting nature of youth by having human figures dissolve into the sky. I expressed the idea by having the human figure look like a flower that is being scattered. I tried my best to make a connection between the beauty of youth and the ephemeral, beautiful flower. 

 

 

LINDSAY

 

What are the media/materials used to create this image?

  

 

JEAN

 

I used watercolor to draw the base and pastel to finish the image. Afterward, I sprayed a spray adhesive and topped it with pastel particulates to provide the scattered look. 

 

LINDSAY

What was your creative process behind the piece?  When you approach art do you have a strong vision of the piece to-be in advance, or does the art demystify its purpose as you are going along creating it?

 

 

JEAN

I always start with some sort of idea in my head as I am a person who believes that all art should have a purpose/meaning. With the idea in my head, I start drawing or painting without a solidified plan. 

 

 

LINDSAY

What are your hopes going forward with your art, what are you looking forward to—any upcoming projects?

 

 

JEAN

 

These days I'm planning for a huge installation project. Although I also enjoy painting and drawing, I like to get really hands-on with my works. This new project I'm looking for will utilize around 50 clay figurines that I made along with barbed wires/junk and reflective 3m.  

 

LINDSAY

Who are the other humans or artists who have inspired you, or left lasting impressions that have helped you in recognizing yourself as an artist?  

 

 

JEAN

 

Without a doubt, Theo Jansen left a long-lasting impression on me. His highly intricate Strandbeests always intrigue me as they are handmade. I was very surprised by how he makes something that is lifeless into something that is very realistic and alive. Theo Jansen inspires me to push through my limits and create something crazier every time. 

LINDSAY

 

Looking at “Fleeting 20s," I was deeply moved by the conjuring of light and figure-motion in the piece.  It seems like a scene that's impressionistic and could happen both in the sky—or paired with watery depths. While it may have nothing to do with the latter, for me what it summons is collision and buddings we don't often notice in places that are fluid—places that also feel unbound, but remain places we can’t often reach. It's a powerful feeling to look at this piece and be reminded of what it feels like to have a blurry view of anemones or fish fleets bursting out of sand-dust under the water, or to see the scattering forms echo how ferns bend up on the earth. I feel a good piece of art conjures a ton of connected images and impressions. Did you want the light or the forms to echo anything else you've observed out in the world?  Does this piece of art have a connection to a time of day or season in your mind?  For me, it feels very vernal.

 

 

JEAN

 

Instead of having one absolute image, I wanted to combine and visualize the flower and the human at the same time. I utilized a blurred image to render the idea of scattering along with colors that were inspired by Monet. And as I wanted to purvey the idea of youth, the ideal season for this artwork is in between spring and summer. 

 

 

LINDSAY

 

What other styles do you find your art embracing?

 

 

 

JEAN

 

Impressionism. I love how the color works with the unique strokes of impressionism artwork. Rather than drawing a hyper-realistic picture, I enjoy drawing impressions. I highly respect Claude Monet, Van Gogh, and many other impressionist artists. 

 

 

LINDSAY

 

Are there particular spaces or habits you rely on to get ready to work on art?

 

 

JEAN

Listening to music, I tend to visualize my art projects. Sometimes, I even work on projects that are correlated to the music I'm listening to. These days I like to get a little bit more experimental with my artworks and try to pass the lines that no one has yet to pass. 

These days I like to get a little bit more experimental with my artworks and try to pass the lines that no one has yet to pass. 

Jean Park is a high-schooler attending Stevenson School in Pebble Beach. He received a Grand Award for the 32nd Korean International Illustration Competition, three Gold Keys in art from 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and many more awards for his art.